Today, we do most of our shopping online but as anyone who’s indulged in late-night retail therapy likely knows, this convenience often can come with an added cost. Trying to curb expenses, but don’t want to swear off the convenience of ordering groceries in your PJs?

New research shows that shopping on a desktop computer instead of a mobile phone may help you avoid making foolish purchases, according to Co. Design. Ying Zhu, a marketing professor at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan, recently led a study to measure how touchscreen technology affects consumer behavior.

Published in the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, her research found that people are more likely to make more frivolous, impulsive purchases if they’re shopping on their phones than if they’re facing a computer monitor.

Zhu, along with study co-author Jeffrey Meyer of Bowling Green State University, ran a series of lab experiments on student participants to observe how different electronic devices affected shoppers’ thinking styles and intentions.

Their aim was to see if subjects’ purchasing goals changed when it came to buying frivolous things, like chocolate or massages, or more practical things, like food or office supplies.

In one experiment, participants were randomly assigned to use a desktop or a touchscreen. Then, they were presented with an offer to purchase either a frivolous item or a useful one. These subjects used a three-point scale to gauge how likely they were to purchase the offer, and they also evaluated how practical or frivolous each item was.

Sure enough, the researchers found that participants had significantly higher purchase intentions for hedonic products when buying on touchscreens than on desktops, according to the study. On the flip side, participants had significantly higher purchase intentions for utilitarian products while using desktops instead of touchscreens.

“The playful and fun nature of the touchscreen enhances consumers’ favor of hedonic products while the logical and functional nature of a desktop endorses the consumers’ preference for utilitarian products,” Zhu explains in a press release.

The study also found that participants using touchscreen technology scored significantly higher on experiential thinking than subjects using desktop computers, whereas those with desktop computers demonstrated higher scores for rational thinking.

“When you’re in an experiential thinking mode, you crave excitement, a different experience,” Zhu explained to Co. Design.

“When you’re on the desktop, with all the work emails, that interface puts you into a rational thinking style. While you’re in a rational thinking style, when you assess a product, you’ll look for something with functionality and specific uses.”

Zhu’s advice for consumers looking to conserve cash? Stow away the smartphone when you’re itching to splurge on a guilty pleasure.

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Scott Smith

Oooh how this man loves shopping and experience things in life. Shopping here, shopping there. Its all about the shopping. He´s obsessed. But he looks good though and knows all about the latest trends, fashion and style.

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